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Dry-Pack Canning

 

 

 

Dry-Pack Canning General Policies

 

Purpose

Ensure that dry-pack canneries are managed in a manner consistent with Welfare Services policies.

Policies

1. Dry-pack canning should be encouraged and promoted. Agent stakes should provide information to regional welfare committees that will assist priesthood and Relief Society leaders in promoting dry-pack family canning. Wards and stakes should promote dry-pack family canning. Ways to do this include calling canning specialists, educating quorum and Relief Society members, and coordinating canning activities.

2. Family dry-pack canning should be done in Church welfare facilities or at members’ homes.

3. Dry-pack canned products should not be resold.

4. Payment for dry-pack canning products or supplies should be made directly to the cannery. Wards and stake should not deposit funds into their bank accounts and then pay the cannery.

5. Family members eight years or older may participate in dry-pack canning if properly supervised. Workers must be at least 16 years of age to operate machinery.

6. Dry-pack canning products may be purchased as individual cans, by the case, or in bulk for home storage.

7. Dry-pack product prices are established by Church headquarters.

 

Dry-Pack Canning Products

Purpose

To describe the products that are approved for dry-pack canning.

Guidelines

1. Approved Products Provided by the Cannery.

Approved products are limited to those that retain flavor and nutritional values and are produced or used by Welfare Services. For storage to be successful, dry-pack, products need to be low moisture (10 percent moisture or less), good quality, and insect free.

The following products are available at dry-pack canneries:

Apple Slices Fruit Drink Mix Pudding, Chocolate

Beans, Pinto Macaroni Pudding, Vanilla

Beans, Pink Milk, Nonfat Dry Soup Mix

Beans, Great Northern Oats, Rolled Sugar, Granulated

Carrots, Dry Onions, Dry Spaghetti

Hot Cocoa Mix Potatoes Wheat

Flour, White White Rice

2. Approved Products Not Provided by the Cannery:

The following additional products are approved for canning. These items are ordered, purchased, payed for, and delivered directly to the individual or group at a place other than a Church facility. They are not delivered by the vendor directly to the cannery.

Grains Low-moisture whole grains (not milled or cracked) that do not have an oily seed coat.

Legumes Dry peas and other beans not listed above.

Pasta Pasta products that do not contain eggs.

Fruits and vegetables Dehydrated or freeze dried products that are dry enough to snap when broken

 

(cont.)

TVP Texturized vegetable protein

Cheese Powder

Gelatin and Pudding Desserts Products that do not contain eggs

3. Storage Suggestions

A. Store dry-pack items in a cool, dry location (70 degrees or cooler) away from sunlight.

B. Store on shelves or on raised platforms rather than directly in contact with concrete floors or walls to avoid moisture damage.

4. Non-approved Products

The following items are examples of products that do not store well in cans because of moisture, oil, or other concerns. These types of products should not be dry-pack canned. These products and emergency supplies such as first-aid kits and food rations (candy, granola bars, etc.) are best stored when rotated frequently.

Baking Powder Milled Grain Cereal

Baking Soda Mixes Containing Leavening

Bouillon (Such as pancake or biscuit mix)

Brown Rice Nuts (roasted or raw)

Brown Sugar Oil

Chewy Dehydrated Fruit (such as raisins) Pearled Barley

Cornmeal Salt

Dried Eggs Spices

Dried Meat Whole Wheat Flour

Granola Yeast

 

Canning Instructions

for #10 Cans

Purpose

To ensure safe, sanitary, and effective canning in #10 cans. These instructions should be provided to all customers who use the dry-pack facilities.

Guidelines

1. Getting Ready

2. Filling Cans

3. Using Oxygen Absorber Packets. Oxygen absorbing packets have a limited shelf life in the open air. Packets should not be exposed to air for more than four hours before cans are sealed.

A. Before opening the bag:

B. Open plastic bag of oxygen absorber packets:

(Cont.)

the bag. (Do not cut open).

C. Remove from the bag the number of packets to be used within the next 30 minutes and spread them out on a tray. These packets are now exposed and will begin to absorb oxygen.

D. Do not repeatedly open and close the plastic bag for a few packets at a time. Do not place unused, exposed packets back into the plastic bag.

E. After removing the packets, reseal the bag by pressing out the air and fastening the clamp above the indicator tablet.

F. Place one packet on the top of the product in each can. Do not puncture or open packets. Use packets with all products except sugar.

Note: Do not leave the plastic bag open to air! Do not refill the tray before using all exposed packets? Do not puncture or open packets. Do not eat contents of packets!

4. Sealing Cans Place lids on cans and seal cans promptly.

5. Labeling Cans Write the date on the product-specific "Not for Sale" labels and place the labels on the cans.

6. Cleaning Up

A. Use a dry towel to wipe off surfaces that have contact with food when changing from one product to another to avoid cross-contamination of products.

B. When you have finished, remove all food residue from the processing area by wiping with a dry cloth, sweeping, and vacuuming. Properly dispose of bags and boxes. Leave area organized and clean.

 

Canning Instructions for

Glass Canning Jars

 

Purpose

To ensure effective storage of dry products in glass jars. These instructions should be provided to all those who do dry-pack canning in glass at home or at the dry-pack cannery.

Instructions

1. Getting Ready

2. Filling Jars

3. Using Oxygen Absorber Packets Oxygen absorbing packets have a limited shelf-life in open air. Packet exposure time to air should not exceed four hours prior to sealing jars.

A. Before opening the bag:

B. Open plastic bag of oxygen absorber packets:

(cont.)

 

C. Remove from the bag the number of packets to be used within the next 30 minutes and spread them out on a try. These packets are now exposed and will begin to absorb oxygen.

D. Do not repeatedly open and close the plastic bag for a few packets at a time. Do not place unused, exposed packets back in the plastic bag.

E. After removing packets, reseal the bag by pressing out the air and fastening the clamp above the indicator tablet.

F. Place packet on the top of the product in each jar. Do not puncture or open packets. Use packets on all products except sugar.

Note: Do not leave plastic bag open to air! Do not refill tray before using all exposed packets! Do not eat contents of packets!

4. Sealing Jars

A. Wipe of jar rim with a clean dry cloth.

B. Place lids on jars and seal firmly.

5. Labeling Jars

Write the date on the product specific "Not for Sale" labels, and place the labels on the jars.

6. Cleaning Up

A. Use a dry towel to wipe off surfaces that have contact with food when changing from one product to another to avoid cross-contamination of products.

B. When you have finished, remove all food residue from the processing area by wiping with a dry cloth, sweeping, and vacuuming. Properly dispose of bags and boxes. Leave area organized and clean.

 

Canning Instructions for

Plastic Buckets

Purpose

To provide instruction for members who would like to keep their food storage in plastic containers.

Guidelines

1. For plastic buckets to be used as dry food storage containers, they should be made of food grade plastic and have a gasketed lid.

2. Carbon dioxide effectively prevents weevil infestation in dry-pack items stored in plastic buckets. To kill weevils, carbon dioxide should be present in concentrations above 3 percent. Treatment methods that depend on the absence of oxygen to kill weevils, such as oxygen absorbers and nitrogen gas flushing, are not always effective in plastic buckets because of the potential for oxygen leakage.

Instructions for Dry Ice Treatment in Buckets

1. Use approximately 1 ounce of dry ice for each gallon of container size.

2. Wipe frost crystals from the dry ice using a clean towel.

3. Place the dry ice in the center of the container bottom.

4. Pour the food on top of the container and until it is within ½ inch to 1 inch of the top.

5. Place the lid on top of the container and snap it down only about halfway around the container.

6. Allow carbon dioxide gas to escape from the partially sealed lid as the dry ice evaporates.

7. Allow the dry ice to evaporate completely before sealing the container. To see if the ice is all gone, feel the bottom of the container. If it is still very cold, the ice has not all evaporated.

8. Watch the container for a few minutes after sealing the lid. If the container bulges, slightly lift the edge of the lid to relieve pressure.

9. It is normal for the lid of the bucket to pull down slightly as a result of the partial vacuum caused when the carbon dioxide is absorbed into the product.